So you have two days as a tourist in Tbilisi???

I hope that readers of this blog will contribute their ideas about activities for tourists in Tbilisi. The following is my list, with the most important activity at the top:

Gabriadze (puppet) theater (http://gabriadze.com/theatre). Every night adults (children can attend, but the primary audience is adults) can see a very creative performance. I prefer The Battle of Stalingrad, but everything is great. New Yorker magazine voted it the best theatrical performance of the year when the Tbilisi group performed in New York City. Subtitles are in English.

Sulfur baths (Abanotubani district) (http://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g294195-d459964-Reviews-Abanotubani_Bath_District-Tbilisi.html). I don’t know where else in Georgia you can go to a public bath and get a massage, and it’s well worthwhile, so do it while visiting Tbilisi. The baths are clean and safe, but not luxurious. You’ll come out feeling very refreshed.

Old Tbilisi (http://livingrootless.blogspot.com/2011/07/georgia-republic-of-orientation-walk-in.html). If someone paints Tbilisi, it will show the houses with balconies that overhang the street. The architecture in very interesting all around the Sulfur baths district.

Sameba (Holy Trinity) Cathedral (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tbilisi_Sameba_Cathedral). This is the largest Georgian Orthodox Church, and if you visit Saturday afternoon or Sunday morning you may say the Patriarch (equivalent to the Pope), but if you can’t visit Sameba, visit another church. With any luck, you’ll see a baptism and hear polyphonic singing.

Georgian National Museum (http://www.georgianmuseums.ge/?lang=eng&id=1_1&sec_id=1&th_id=28) . See the gold jewelry from the 8th century BC to more modern times. It’s right on Rustaveli Ave., the main street, so when you finish with the museum, rest and then walk along a very interesting street.

Dry Bridge art and antiques open-air market (http://www.ianyanmag.com/2011/07/19/the-big-picture-tbilisis-dy-bridge-market/). Susanna and I like looking at the art every few weeks. We also enjoy talking with people. It’s like a big flea market but more interesting because the stuff is not from your neighborhood.

St. David’s Church. This is one of many beautiful Georgian Orthodox Churches, but this one is on Mt. Mtatsminda and it provides a great view of Tbilisi, especially at dusk, when the city lights glow against a purple sky.

Foods. You can eat Georgian food anywhere in Georgia, so I’m not sure of any special restaurants or dishes that can be found only in Tbilisi. Before you leave Georgia, however, you must eat khachapuri (flat bread with cheese inside), khinkali (dumplings with meat, mushrooms, potatoes inside), trout, and eggplant with nuts (walnuts).

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Nana and Shota marry

Nana Mghebrishvili and Shota Kiparoidze were married in St. David’s Church on Mt. Mtatsminda, near our home; copyright Keith Kenney, 2012.

Nana Mghebrishvili and Shota Kiparoidze were married in St. David’s Church; copyright Keith Kenney, 2012.

Nana Mghebrishvili and Shota Kiparoidze each kissed an icon during the ceremony; copyright Keith Kenney, 2012.

Tamaz Jalagania provided 14 swords for the wedding ceremony. The swords symbolize strength and by walking under the swords the couple will have a strong marriage. Copyright Keith Kenney, 2012.

Snow!

In the park near our apartment in Old Tbilisi; copyright Keith Kenney, 2012

Immediately in front of our apartment; copyright Keith Kenney, 2012

St. David's Church, above our apartment; copyright Keith Kenney, 2012